Archive for category Youth

YOUTH EMPOWERMENT EVENT – RISE12

RISERCCG National Young Adult & Youth Affairs Presents
The Redeemed Initiative for Skills & Empowerment (RISE 12)
DATE: 18th September – 3rd October 2016


COURSES AVAILABLE: Project Management, Web Design, Photography, Video Editing, etc.

I WILL BE THERE! (SEE FLIER FOR DETAILS)

 

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Being Introverted is not a Spell

image

Dear CoachFaith, I was invited for an interview with a leading commercial bank, and one of the questions they practically repeated for all the candidates was… “Would you consider yourself an extrovert or introvert” Quite frankly, I am an introvert but that’s the problem. I don’t have so much point to prove that being introverted is a plus. I saw disapproval on the panel’s faces as I made my case. Can we all be extroverts and what are likely advantages on being introverted. – Shola, Lagos. Read the rest of this entry »

Leave a comment

A Message for Misfits by Charles R. Swindoll

image

Judges 11:1-3, 11 – Before he ever came to the plate, Jephthah had three strikes against him.

He was an illegitimate child. Strike one.
He was the son of a barmaid and a brute. Strike two.
He was raised in an atmosphere of hatred and hostility. Strike three.
Nurtured in an overcrowded cage of half-brothers, he was the constant target of verbal put-downs and violent profanity. Putting it mildly, Jephthah wasn’t wanted. He compensated by becoming the meanest kid on the block.

Kicked out of home before he reached young manhood, he took up the lifestyle of a rebel among a tough bunch of thugs that hob-nobbed in a place called Tob. Earning a reputation as the hardest hard-guy, he was elected leader of a gang. They ripped and rammed their way through villages like a pack of wild hyenas. Had they ridden motorcycles, their black leather jackets could have read “The Tob Mob” as they raced over hills, outrunning the law of the land. Read Judges 11:1-3 for yourself. It’s all there. A societal reject, Jephthah was Charles Manson, the Boston Strangler, and Clyde Barrow all wrapped in one explosive body. Having him and his apes drop into the Tob Pharmacy for Saturday night malts was about as comfortable as taking a swim with the Loch Ness monster.

Suddenly, a change occurred. The people of Israel encountered a barrage of hostilities from their not-so-friendly neighbors to the east—the Ammonites. The longer the battle raged against this hateful enemy tribe, the more obvious it became that Israel was against the ropes. Defeat was inevitable. The Jews needed a leader with guts to stand up against the fiery foes from Ammon. Guess who the Israelites thought of? Right! They figured that only a guy with his record would qualify for the job, so they called the man from Tob. Tremblingly, they said:

Come and be our chief that we may fight against the sons of Ammon. . . . and [you may] become head over all the inhabitants of Gilead. (Judges 11:6, 8)

What a deal! Asking Jephthah if he could fight was like asking Al Hirt if he could blow some jazz or A. J. Foyt if he could drive you around the block. That was Jephthah’s day in court. After a brief cat-and-mouse interchange, the mobster signed the dotted line. Predictably, he annihilated the Ammonites in short order and the Tob Evening News rolled off the presses with the headline:

HOODLUM BECOMES HERO—
EX-CON ELECTED JUDGE!

Jephthah the judge. Fellow gangsters had to call him “Your Honor.” What a switch! Jephthah had no rightful claim to such a high calling.

That would have been true—except for one thing: God’s grace. Remember now, God is the One who builds trophies from the scrap pile . . . who draws His clay from under the bridge . . . who makes clean instruments of beauty from the filthy failures of yesteryear.

To underscore this truth, consider Paul’s stunning remark made to a group of unsophisticated Corinthian Christians:

Do not be deceived: Neither the sexually immoral nor idolaters nor adulterers nor male prostitutes nor homosexual offenders nor thieves nor the greedy nor drunkards nor slanderers nor swindlers will inherit the kingdom of God. And that is what some of you were. (1 Corinthians 6:9-11a NIV)

Don’t rush over those last eight words:

And that is what some of you were . . .

Our Father, in great grace, loved us when you and I were Jephthah—a rebel or a drunk or a gossip or a crook or a liar or a brawler or a Pharisee or a playboy or an adulteress or a hypocrite or a do-gooder or a dropout or a drug addict. Looking for sinners, He found us in desperate straits. Lifting us to the level of His much-loved Son, He brought us in, washed our wounds, and changed our direction. All our church-going and hymn-singing and long-praying and committee-sitting and religious-talking will never ease the fact that we were dug from a deep, dark, deadly pit. And may we never forget it. Classic misfits . . . we.

But there is one major difference between Jephthah and us. God chose to reveal his past for everyone to read, while He chose to hide ours so none would ever know what colossal misfits we really are. Talk about grace!

Leave a comment

What are You Doing?

Yesterday, I was reading and came across a story, which looked so true to me. In just few words it delivered a wise message. I’d like to share it with you too.

The story was about three men, who were working on a construction site. All of them were cutting stones. All three of them were asked the same question, but their answers were completely different.

 The question was simple: “What are you doing?”

 The answers were the following:

 The first man told: “I am cutting a stone”.

The second one said: “I am making a living”.

And only the third one told: “I am building a cathedral”.

 It all comes down to purpose, I guess. The first man did not see purpose or any value in what he was doing. Most probably at the end of the day he went home tired and did not want to go back to work the next morning. This guy was the unhappiest one.

 The second guy looked at it differently. For him there was a value in what he did – that is earning a living. He knew why he was getting up every morning and compared to the first man, this one had a driving force that kept him going. But the second man saw the value of all his efforts in getting his salary only. In best case the guy will be looking for a better paid job and move on at some point.

The third man knew that the first two men were right. He too was cutting a stone and making a living, but he saw something more in what he did. He was also making a difference. He was building a cathedral for all those, who needed hope and spirituality. The guy felt that it was much more than cutting stones and maybe that is why he was at peace with what he did every day.

So which one are you?

Are you cutting a stone, making a living or building a cathedral? Are you making a difference?


You’re Great-by-Design
#CoachFaith

, , ,

Leave a comment

7 Ways Christians Should behave Online by Ron Edmondson

image

I have had an online ministry for more than 15 years. God has humbled me with the way He has chosen to use this influence He has given me. I try not to take it for granted.

One thing that has changed since I began ministering online—and it’s changed for all of us—is the rise of social media. Whether you believe it’s a good addition or not, we cannot deny its impact on culture or even on the church. Personally, I have chosen to use it for good as much as possible.

Still, it disturbs me some of the ways I see Christians respond on social media. I can post one thing, whether serious or not—and I do use humor intentionally as a part of my online presence—and it never amazes me how someone might respond. I have referred to the practice as a “slam and run.” I just have to thank God at times for the delete option. But it’s an example of a bigger problem. Christians aren’t always behaving well online. What we’d never say offline we have no problem saying online.

Seriously, this isn’t a personal plea. This is a kingdom plea. Just as the world is watching how Christians respond in public, they are watching how we respond online. We must be careful, then, with what we post. All of us will be misunderstood. But we shouldn’t be blatantly offensive.

Here are seven ways Christians should behave online:

1. No soapbox. We are told to “do everything without arguing or complaining” (Phil. 2:14). That doesn’t mean we can’t support causes we believe in, but they should be moral and biblical issues, not personal agendas.

2. No public bashing. Unless you’ve practiced Matthew 18 principles, and even then it would be rare, don’t address your problems with others online. It’s not helpful and never promotes peace (Rom. 12:18; Heb. 12:14).

3. No little jabs. We shouldn’t say things about others that may be misinterpreted as a stab against them. Guard your online tongue (James 3). I see this especially as a passive-aggressive tactic. We feel safe evoking insults or cuts to another person online that we would never say to their face.

4. Encouragement. Social media can be a great way to encourage others. We shouldn’t spam with massive amounts of posts. Few appreciate the person who reshares everything they see, but most everyone likes to read an encouraging word pointed especially to them (Eph. 4:29).

5. Do to others. As we’d have them do to us. We should always think before we post. Pause. Breathe. Think. Post. Ask yourself how you would be impacted by the post before you post it (Luke 6:31).

6. Guard against pride. We have to be careful with self-promotion and bragging about ourselves online. Granted, this is coming from one who has built an online platform online, and I frequently encourage other pastors to do the same. It’s one of the best ways currently to engage people for kingdom building. But this is a reminder for me too. We must check our motives, guard our hearts and never allow our egos to rob glory from what God wants to do through our online presence (Prov. 11:2; 13:10).

7. Do not allow it to be a replacement for community. It’s easy to post “Happy birthday” or reply “Praying for you” without really doing so. We shouldn’t trade the functions of the body for an online presence (Acts 2:42-47; Heb. 10:24).

Those are seven that come to my mind. What would you add? (Be general, please, and not specific in your comments, so as not to violate the purpose of the post.)

Ron Edmondson is a church planter and pastor with a heart for strategy, leadership and marketing, especially geared toward developing churches and growing and improving the kingdom of God.

For a full copy of this article and more visit http://www.ronedmondson.com


You’re Great-by-Design
#CoachFaith

, , , ,

Leave a comment

7 Ways Christians Should behave Online by Ron Edmondson

image

I have had an online ministry for more than 15 years. God has humbled me with the way He has chosen to use this influence He has given me. I try not to take it for granted.

One thing that has changed since I began ministering online—and it’s changed for all of us—is the rise of social media. Whether you believe it’s a good addition or not, we cannot deny its impact on culture or even on the church. Personally, I have chosen to use it for good as much as possible.

Still, it disturbs me some of the ways I see Christians respond on social media. I can post one thing, whether serious or not—and I do use humor intentionally as a part of my online presence—and it never amazes me how someone might respond. I have referred to the practice as a “slam and run.” I just have to thank God at times for the delete option. But it’s an example of a bigger problem. Christians aren’t always behaving well online. What we’d never say offline we have no problem saying online.

Seriously, this isn’t a personal plea. This is a kingdom plea. Just as the world is watching how Christians respond in public, they are watching how we respond online. We must be careful, then, with what we post. All of us will be misunderstood. But we shouldn’t be blatantly offensive.

Here are seven ways Christians should behave online:

1. No soapbox. We are told to “do everything without arguing or complaining” (Phil. 2:14). That doesn’t mean we can’t support causes we believe in, but they should be moral and biblical issues, not personal agendas.

2. No public bashing. Unless you’ve practiced Matthew 18 principles, and even then it would be rare, don’t address your problems with others online. It’s not helpful and never promotes peace (Rom. 12:18; Heb. 12:14).

3. No little jabs. We shouldn’t say things about others that may be misinterpreted as a stab against them. Guard your online tongue (James 3). I see this especially as a passive-aggressive tactic. We feel safe evoking insults or cuts to another person online that we would never say to their face.

4. Encouragement. Social media can be a great way to encourage others. We shouldn’t spam with massive amounts of posts. Few appreciate the person who reshares everything they see, but most everyone likes to read an encouraging word pointed especially to them (Eph. 4:29).

5. Do to others. As we’d have them do to us. We should always think before we post. Pause. Breathe. Think. Post. Ask yourself how you would be impacted by the post before you post it (Luke 6:31).

6. Guard against pride. We have to be careful with self-promotion and bragging about ourselves online. Granted, this is coming from one who has built an online platform online, and I frequently encourage other pastors to do the same. It’s one of the best ways currently to engage people for kingdom building. But this is a reminder for me too. We must check our motives, guard our hearts and never allow our egos to rob glory from what God wants to do through our online presence (Prov. 11:2; 13:10).

7. Do not allow it to be a replacement for community. It’s easy to post “Happy birthday” or reply “Praying for you” without really doing so. We shouldn’t trade the functions of the body for an online presence (Acts 2:42-47; Heb. 10:24).

Those are seven that come to my mind. What would you add? (Be general, please, and not specific in your comments, so as not to violate the purpose of the post.)

Ron Edmondson is a church planter and pastor with a heart for strategy, leadership and marketing, especially geared toward developing churches and growing and improving the kingdom of God.

For a full copy of this article and more visit http://www.ronedmondson.com


You’re Great-by-Design
#CoachFaith

, , , ,

Leave a comment

NIGERIA is 53

Hello my friends and reader across the Atlantic and beyond the Pacific…am glad to let you know today being 1st of Oct. 2013 marks the 53rd anniversary of Independence from Nigeria’s colonial ruler and master, the Great Britain.

It a big celebration in Nigeria…

I dedicate this post to my embattled President,(And his amiable Dame Patience Jonathan…the firstlady of Nigeria…) I wish him all the freedom this season can bring and the wisdom to glide in the tide of gladiators.

I wish also that the president make moves to hold a Sovereign National Conference, a platform in which Nigeria can by herself determine her future and fate!

I Love You Mr. President
– Toward a New Nigeria

You’re Great-By-Design

, , , , , ,

2 Comments